Hiking Akiyoshidai and Akiyoshido

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August 8, 2013

Shots on the way, hiking up to Akiyoshidai (秋吉台国定公園) in Yamaguchi Prefecture (山口県), Japan. On another note, I freaking love VSCO’s new Film 04 Slide presets for Lightroom. Amazing bold colours. Reminds me of flipping through Nat Geo as a kid.

In Akiyoshidai, Japan. On probably the hottest day, ever. Too hot to even look at the camera lens with my eyes open. That hot. So hot. But! Despite that, it was a pretty awesome place; I kept thinking it looked sort of like the Scottish highlands. The thermometer at the observatory said it felt like 41˚ Celcius. Coming out from Akiyoshido (the cave system underneath) the difference in temperature was so immense that all my lenses started developing some serious fogging/condensation because the air from below was so moist and cool compared to up above.

All the stones in the background are called ‘karst’ formations. They’re created when limestone bedrock dissolves, leaving its jagged remains behind as the water dries up over time. The area below (akiyoshido) is Japan’s largest natural cave system, and has over 400 limestone caves (although only one route is available for passage by pedestrians and tourists.

It might look bright because of the long exposure, but this is actually an underground river in a cave system called Akiyoshido, in Akiyoshi, Japan. It’s the largest cave system in Japan, and quite hilariously called a ‘quasi’ national park in English. How is something a ‘quasi’ national park, I’d like to know. I google’d it, and as far as I can tell, Japan’s the only country that follows this naming convention. Just make them official national parks, already! They’re gorgeous!

I had a great time checking out the limestone formations, and just being in the cave in general. Cave temperatures year round are around 17˚ which was just so, so, so much nicer than the totally unnecessarily hot temperatures outside.

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