The Happiness of Pursuit by Chris Guillebeau

TIME TO BACKTRACK HERE to the book that inadvertently kicked off my 41-books in 41-weeks reading streak (currently on 4/41!). 

I say inadvertent because it wasn’t until I was reading book 2/41 that I decided to turn this whole book-a-week schtick into a proper quest, but considering Happiness of Pursuit is all about goals, I have to give it a tip of my hat, as I’m sure it had some latent influence in my decision.

The book’s tagline, ‘Finding the quest that will bring purpose to your life’ is a bit cheesy and embarrassing to read in public. It sounds pretty self-helpful, but then again, cat posters that say ‘you can do it’ are also cheesy, but they’re also usually right. Never underestimate the power of a good cat poster. Anyway, back to this book.

I really like how Chris chalked up some of his passion for list-making and goal-seeking to his love of video games as a child. I played a lot of Legend of Zelda, Pokémon, Donkey Kong, Mario, and other classics as a kid, and having the video game narrative that’s basically, “do these things, become stronger, help people, save the world.” had a really huge impact on me for the better. 

Chris’ book is cool because it also ropes in lots of other people’s quests. He talks about their structure, what makes for a successful quest, and different types of quests (done from home, or done traveling the world).

I finished reading it at a coffee shop in Harvard Square, feeling quite accomplished and proud of myself for being in Boston for something (Women in Travel Summit) that fulfilled a part of a larger quest for me (how to make a career out of travelling the world writing and taking pictures). 

This book comes as recommended, but I don’t think there’s a whole lot of re-read value, so maybe ask to borrow a friend’s, or rent it from the library! Libraries rock.

I’m reading 41 books this year. See original post here.


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